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DOI

10.22543/7674.91.P115

Abstract

Non-Hodgkin’s malignant lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of hematological malignancies, characterized by a variety of clinical, morphological, histopathological, immuno-histochemical, molecular and evolutionary features. They represent a form of cancer that develops from the lymphatic tissue, as a result of the malignant transformation of B (85%) or T (15%) lymphocytes. Lymphomagenesis is described as a multi-stage process involving the mutation and proliferation of cell clones. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance of cellular redox status caused by the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/ or by decreasing antioxidant systems that allows their accumulation in the cell. Small quantities of ROS are involved in physiological mechanisms such as cell growth and differentiation, cell signaling, antimicrobial defense, phagocytosis. Normally, cells are capable of defending themselves against ROS damage through various scavenger systems. On the other hand, excessive ROS contribute to various diseases such as carcinogenesis, ischemia, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress exerts noxious effects on the cell structures by inducing structural changes in membranes, lipids, proteins or DNA. The present review summarizes the latest findings in understanding the ROS-linked signaling pathways in the initiation of lymphomagenesis, disease progression, metastasis, as well as in the pharmacodynamics of specific treatments for this malignancy.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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