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DOI

10.22543/7674.82.P299305

Abstract

Background. The prevalence of psychological difficulties is rising at an alarming rate, with an increasing number of individuals reporting symptoms of depression. A decline in both perceived control and desire for control has previously been associated with the onset of depression. However, previous research has failed to examine whether perceived control and desire for control interact in their relationship with depressive symptomology. Methods. A sample of 350 participants completed the Spheres of Control Scale, the Desirability of Control Scale and Beck’s Depression Inventory. Process Macro was used to examine whether desire for control moderated the relationship between perceived control and depressive symptomology. Results. Desire for control significantly moderated the relationship between perceived control and depressive symptomology. The results indicated that variations in perceived control had a greater effect on the manifestation of depressive symptomology in individuals with lower desire for control than those with higher desire for control. Discussion. This study provides novel evidence that desire for control moderates the relationship between perceived control and depressive symptomology. The clinical implications of the results are discussed, with reference to future research. Conclusions. The results indicate that individuals with lower desire for control are more sensitive to variations in perceived control, such that decrements in perceived control contribute to a greater increase in depressive symptomology, and vice versa.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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