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DOI

10.22543/7674.61.P3140

Abstract

Oncogenesis is an extremely complex phenomenon. The mechanisms by which cancer is induced is only partially known. Consequently, therapeutic targets may be uncertain and results are often unsatisfactory. The purpose of this paper is to develop a trans-level and multiple transdisciplinary perspective describing the kaleidoscopic reality of oncogenesis. This manner of understanding oncogenesis as a complex process characterized by a non-linear dynamic, far from equilibrium and with unpredictable evolution, transcends the classical perspective and requires a paradigm shift. This approach is also facilitated by recent studies that focus on group phenomena, with emerging behaviors in a continuous phase transition. Biological systems, and obviously the human organism, express this type of behavior with critical self-organizing valences in the context of a genome - mesotope (environment) - phenotype interaction. For example, nature has transposed in the ecosystem, among other things, the performance pattern of its mineral history represented by the dynamic energy-matter-information unit (the principle of invariance). And multi-cell biological systems in the phylogenetic tree crown have multiple directed aerobic metabolisms in accordance with specific functions. Cancers, in turn, have a hybrid (anaerobic and aerobic) and unidirectional metabolism whose only and ultimate reason is the survival of the malignant cell. Understanding the transdisciplinary reality of oncogenesis offers novel development paths for new therapeutic strategies compared to current ones which have relatively limited efficiency.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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