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DOI

10.22543/7674.61.P130136

Abstract

The human microbiota is paramount for normal host physiology. Altered host-microbiome interactions are part of the pathogenesis of numerous common ailments. Currently, much emphasis is placed on the involvement of the microbiome in the pathogenesis of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), impaired glucose tolerance, and other metabolic disorders (i.e. obesity). Several studies found highly significant correlations of specific intestinal bacteria with T2DM. A better understanding of the role of the microbiome in diabetes and its complications might provide new insights in the development of new therapeutic principles.

Our pilot study investigates the microbiota patterns in Romanian type-2 diabetic patients with diabetic kidney disease. Fecal samples were collected from type 2-diabetic patients and healthy controls and further used for bacterial DNA isolation. Using 16 rDNA qRT-PCR, we analyzed phyla abundance (Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes) as well as the relative abundance of specific bacterial groups (Lactobacillus sp., Enterobacteriaceae, Ruminococus sp., Prevotella sp., Faecalibacterium sp., Clostridium coccoides, Clostridium leptum). Our study also investigates the diabetic fungal microbiome for the first time. Furthermore, we report significant correlations between the treatment regimen and microbiota composition in diabetic nephropathy.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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