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Authors

Oana C. Șeremet, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
Octavian T. Olaru, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Botany and Cellular Biology, Bucharest, Romania
Mihaela Ilie, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, Bucharest, Romania
Claudia M. Guțu, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, Bucharest, Romania
Mihai G. Nițulescu, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Bucharest, Romania
Camelia Diaconu, Carol Davila University, Internal Medicine Clinic of Emergency Hospital of Bucharest, Romania
Catalina Motofei, ASE Bucharest, Department of analysis and economic-financial evaluation, Statistics, Bucharest, Romania
Denisa Margină, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Biochemistry, Bucharest, Romania
Simona Negreș, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
Cristina E. Zbârcea, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
Emil Ștefănescu, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, Bucharest, RomaniaFollow

DOI

10.22543/7674.52.P294299

Abstract

Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are a class of toxic compounds found in the composition of more than 6000 plants. People can be exposed to PAs by consuming phytotherapeutic products, food from crops contaminated with seeds of some species with high content of PAs, and/ or contaminated animal products like bee products. For this reason we developed and validated a method for quantitative determination of PAs, from the most frequently contaminated food sources, honey and flour. Colorimetric Ehrlich reagent method was used with standard addition (1mg/kg senecionine). The extraction solvent was methanol 50% acidified with citric acid to pH 2-3, as this solvent can be used for alkaloids and N-oxides. We found that, in extracting the alkaloid only once from the dietary sources, the percent of recovery is low (52.5% for honey, and 45.75% for flour). Using successive extractions, three times with the same solvent, the senecionine retrieval percentage increased to 86.0% for honey and 76.0% for flour. The method was validated using the following parameters: selectivity, linearity (0,25- 20 mg/ mL senecionine), accuracy (average recovery 93.5 - 107.93%) and precision (RSD 3,26-4.55%.). The calculated limit of quantification (0.174 mg/ mL) makes this method applicable for determining Pas occurring at toxic levels for consumers.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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