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DOI

10.22543/7674.51.P135140

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) represents a fundamental issue for public health, with long term evolution and the gradual appearance of several complications and associated pathologies. One of these pathologies is represented by cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, a disorder characterized by the appearance in the patient’s serum of the cryoglobulins, which typically precipitate at temperatures below normal body temperature (37°C) and dissolve again if the serum is heated. Here, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with HCV that, during the evolution of the hepatic disease, developed a form of cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. The connection between the vasculitis and the hepatic disorder was revealed following treatment with interferon, with the temporary remission of both pathologies and subsequent relapse at the end of the 12 months of treatment, the patient becoming a non-responder. The particularity of the case is represented by both the severity of the vasculitic disease from its onset and the deterioration of renal function up to the predialitic phase, a situation not typical of the evolution of cryoglobulinemia. Taking into account the hepatic disorder, the inevitable evolution towards cirrhosis, and the risk of developing the hepatocellular carcinoma, close monitoring is necessary.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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