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DOI

10.22543/7674.51.P101108

Abstract

Microsatellite instability (MSI) is a feature of colorectal tumors that develops as a result of inactivation of the DNA mismatch repair system. It is found in about 15% of all colorectal cancers and is an important prognostic molecular marker when assessing patients with colorectal cancer. It can influence prognosis and treatment decisions in both the advanced and early stages. Although in early stages this marker suggests a favorable prognosis and presents an important argument against adjuvant treatment in stage II disease, in metastatic stages it no longer associated with such an optimistic outcome. The present trial is a prospective, single-center study which included 122 colorectal cancer patients who were tested for MSI using immunohistochemistry. The trial included patients with stage II to IV colorectal cancer, treated in the Prof. Dr. Agrippa Ionescu Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania. Follow-up data were collected during a 24-month period. The study attempted to determine whether differences exist in overall survival for MSI (microsatellite instability) vs. MSS (microsatellite stable) colorectal cancer and to ascertain whether sex of the patient influences prognosis in MSI patients, irrespective of stage or treatment. Results demonstrated no significant differences in survival for MSI vs MSS colorectal patients, and patients’ gender proved not to influence the outcome in MSI patients.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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