Date of Award

5-2020

Degree Type

Evidence-Based Project Report

Degree Name

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)

Department

Nursing

First Advisor

Jeffrey A. Coto

Abstract

Tobacco usage leads to the development of a multitude of diseases. Years of research have shown that evidence-based interventions such as counseling and pharmacotherapy increase smoking quit rates. Studies have demonstrated that either proactive or reactive telephone counseling has been beneficial in providing long term smoking abstinence particularly in disadvantaged populations (Haas et al., 2015). The purpose of the project was to improve smoking cessation by facilitating access to telephone counseling using an electronic medical order. The Stevens Star Model of Knowledge Transformation (Stevens, 2004), was the framework employed to support the process for change. This evidenced-based project occurred at a safety net hospital that served a population of socioeconomically disadvantaged. In total, twenty-four self-identified smokers, accessed through an electronic order, that utilized telephone counseling as an intervention for twelve weeks were assessed. Success of the intervention was measured by improved smoking outcomes in smokers and it was determined whether age was a factor in success comparing outcomes in those younger than 57 years old to those older than 57 years of age. Data expressed as mean and standard deviation, while Paired t tests were conducted on all comparisons. Overall, in the twenty-four individuals, when comparing week one with week twelve, daily cigarette usage declined between the two time points (mean difference of 2.13 ± 0.694, p < 0.01). When the difference in self-reported smoking was examined by age group, it was observed that cessation significantly declined in those younger than 57 (mean 2.3 ± 0.675, p <0.01) and those older than 57 (mean 2.427 ± 0.700, p < 0.01). On average, both age groups declined smoking by two cigarettes over the twelve-week intervention. Results demonstrated that access to telephone counseling improved smoking outcomes.

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
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