Title

Impact of Blood Flow Restriction on Resistance Training of the Biceps Brachii

Faculty Sponsor

Dr. Kelly Helm

College

Arts and Sciences

Department/Program

Kinesiology

ORCID Identifier(s)

0000-0003-2223-605X

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Symposium Date

Spring 2019

Abstract

In an attempt to optimize and accelerate the effects of resistance training, athletes started using blood flow restriction (BFR) as a modality to enhance training intensity. Occlusion (BFR) cuffs made of polypropylene are designed to limit perfusion distal to the cuff to maximize hypertrophy, muscular strength, and muscular endurance gains. The purpose of this research was to analyze the impact BFR had on the upper arm during biceps training. Twenty Division I football players at a small, midwestern university were randomly assigned to a BFR group that wore BFR bands during training sessions, and a control (NBFR) group that did not wear BFR bands during training. All data was collected over a four-week period in the team’s strength and conditioning facility. Participants were tested for upper arm circumference, one-repetition maximum (1RM), and muscular endurance for the biceps brachii before and after the training sessions using the standing barbell biceps curl. Data was analyzed using a one-way independent t-test of mean scores for each test. Results indicated that both groups were able to increase upper arm circumference, 1RM, and muscular endurance scores. Data analysis revealed no statistically significant difference between the BFR and NBFR groups, however, the results indicated that the BFR group had greater improvements in upper arm growth and muscular strength, suggesting a practical benefit from BFR may exist.

Biographical Information about Author(s)

Drew Snouffer is a former collegiate football player, applying what he learns from being an Exercise Science degree to improve the overall health and athleticism of himself, the University’s football team, and his peers. Drew intends on using what he has learned to become a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist, and a Strength and Conditioning Coach for collegiate athletes.

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