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DOI

10.22543/7674.42.P125131

Abstract

The side effects of Finasteride are currently a subject of controversy. Some studies report minor or acceptable adverse effects, which decrease after a variable period of time so that they do not necessitate terminating Finasteride administration. However, several clinical and neuro-endocrine studies show that some adverse effects persist indefinitely in the form of post-Finasteride syndrome, even after the drug cessation. This paper presents a possible explanation for these inconsistent findings. First, the study design of either informing or not informing patients prior therapy about possible adverse effects can influence the incidence and magnitude of reported adverse effects. Second, structural and information dichotomies of the brain generate four distinct neuronal networks, which are activated through specific cerebral neuromodulators and that are able to support four distinct minds within an individual body. As a conclusion, the “mind psychophysiology” and the corresponding mental impairments differ across individuals, such that not only the prediction of adverse effects should be addressed from a more individualized medical perspective, but also the therapeutic strategies could be tailored to the four distinct mental profiles described. It is a personalized approach that would be applicable to several interrelated domains of neuroscience, like psychology, psychiatry and sexuality. Finally, this perspective may represent a starting point for a more individualized understanding of mental events, perhaps even a step forward in the understanding of the mind-body problem.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.